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WSB Inspiration: Sudip Saunders


Black History Month Blog Series


As part of our school-wide honoring of Black History Month, throughout the month of February we will be highlighting some of our spectacular Black and African American faculty and staff. Today, we talk with the superb Ms. Sudip Saunders - WSB Eurythmy teacher, movement artist, painter, muralist, friend, daughter, wife and all around exceptional human.


How has your background/influences brought you to this position, and what drew you to Eurythmy ?

WSB Trailblazer: Tiffany Hamm


Q&A with Trailblazer Ms. Tiffany Hamm


As part of our school-wide honoring of Black History Month, throughout the month of February we will be highlighting some of our spectacular Black and African American faculty and staff. Today, we talk with Ms. Tiffany Hamm - the Waldorf School of Baltimore's first Black Early Childhood Lead Teacher, and all around exceptional human.


How has your background/influences brought you to this position, and what made you want to be a Waldorf Early Childhood Teacher?

Guest Post: How to Be An Invasive Plant Hunter

For more than a century, Waldorf education has maintained a strong focus on immersing children in the outdoors to promote a love of nature. Led by dedicated class teachers, the Waldorf School of Baltimore has transformed this core belief into a formal, concerted effort to prepare our students to become empowered, responsible environmental stewards. Part of that important work is keeping our wonderful Waldorf Woods healthy by clearing away invasive and non-native plants and vines.

Celebrating 50 Years of Waldorf Education in Baltimore

Our school began as the New Morning School, opening its doors to 15 preschool children in 1971. Originally housed in property rented from the City of Baltimore, this little school set off on a big journey.

A look back at the history of the Waldorf School of Baltimore (so named in 1978) reveals 50 years of progress and achievement. Strong grounding principles, responsible innovations, community support and social responsibility have led the School to grow and to flourish.

Snow Much Fun

Snow days have arrived, and with them all kinds of seasonal fun, from snow castles to sledding, snowballs to snow angels. This week, students of every age and grade were unable to resist the inherent joy found in 3-4 inches fresh snowfall. >

"This is the BEST DAY of my LIFE" exclaimed one exuberant first grader, "This is amazing!" laughed a nearby third grader, speeding down the hillside on a sled.

Winter Light Traditions

The Waldorf School of Baltimore’s rich festival life connects our community with cultures the world over, by celebrating seasonal rhythms, important moments in history, and spiritual traditions. Families at WSB celebrate December’s season of long nights by bringing warmth and light through rich and reverent celebrations.

Woodworking Magic

A unique and wonderful part of Waldorf Education, which speaks to to the beauty and breadth of the philosophy as a whole, is Woodworking. Who better then to quote, then Ms. Edna Emmett who has graced us with her teaching talent as the art/woodwork teacher (as well as board Member, collegium member and past parent) at WSB for an incredible 30 years.

A Waldorf Winter Solstice Story

Once upon a time, on a frosty December night, a group of little Fairies huddled in their home deep under the roots of a giant oak tree. They were safe and warm. Outside, the wind blew cold and snow covered the ground. "I saw the Sun King today," the fairy named Rose said "He looked so old and tired as he walked off through the forest.”

"The great oak said he's dying" answered her sister, Daffodil.

Feliz Día de los Muerto

The Waldorf School of Baltimore marks and honors an array of beautiful multi-cultural traditions; an essential part of our rich community life. This week we have been busy making our yearly preparations to celebrate Día de los Muertos.

Active Learning in Grade Four

What stands out most from a recent visit to grade four wasn’t the class’s manners, which were exceedingly polite. It wasn’t the dynamic approach to which they were practicing their mathematical equations, which was artistic and lovely. It wasn’t even the excitement of watching the class delve into their pivotal Human-Animal main lesson block, or the stunning chalkboard drawing Ms. Valencia had composed to accompany it.

No, what stands out the most was how ACTIVE the lesson was, how rich and layered the teaching was, and how engaged and enthusiastic the students were